Roots of the Faith – Trusting Scripture (the Canon of Scripture)

My notes for Wednesday night, Dec 7th. Remember, these are my personal study notes and not a manuscript of the sermon. They are provided as an outline each week for our Tabernacle Church family. Our study over the next few months will be “The Roots of the Faith.” This study will focus on key biblical truths that will transform our thinking and allow us to faithfully live out the Christian life. The church provides a live stream of the service each Wednesday at 6:30 on Facebook. We also provide the services through YouTube. You can find Sermon Notes, Family Devotional Guides, Prayer List, and other resources at our Church Website.

Helpful Resources for this Study

50 Core Truths of the Christian Faith – Gregg R. Allision

Systematic Theology: An Introduction to Biblical Doctrine – Wayne Grudem

Biblical Doctrine: A Systematic Summary of Bible Truth – John MacArthur & Richard Mayhue


If we are to trust and obey God absolutely, we must have a collection of words that we are certain are God’s own words to us. If there are any sections of Scripture about which we have doubts whether they are God’s words or not, we will not consider them to have absolute divine authority, and we will not trust them as much as we would trust God himself.

Wayne Grudem, Systematic Theology: An Introduction to Biblical Doctrine, Second Edition. (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan Academic, 2020), 39.

Canon – Literally means a rule or standard for testing straightness. The term is most closely associated with the collection of the 66 books of the Bible that the church has recognized as the written and inspired Word of God.

Therefore…to say we have the Canon of Scripture is to say we believe that the Holy Bible is all that God has intended us to have for His inspired Word.  We will find no new letter, we will receive no new revelation, we should recognize no other books as from God Himself.

Additional Study:

How Did We Get the New Testament Canon? – Explore the Bible: Lifeway

How We Got Our Bible: Christian History Timeline – Christianity Today

Canon of Scripture – Ligonier Ministries


Bible Facts

Curt Daniel, Basis Christian Doctrines, Conway AR: Free Grace Press, 2022), 55.

1.   The Bible is a Unity.

Though it has many individual books in it, the Bible is a unity. It is both one book and many books. It has unity and diversity. It is basically one book, The Book. Though it has many human authors for its parts, it is primarily one book by God Himself. God used the many authors over a period of approximately 1500 years to write the Bible progressively, each building on what has already been given. Since it is an infallible unity, all parts agree. The individual authors and books ought not to be seen as contradictory, but complementary to each other.

2.   The Bible Has Two Testaments.

The most obvious and significant division in the Bible is that it has two large sections known as testaments. A testament is a covenant, or holy contract between God and Man. The first is the Old Covenant. It makes up about three-fourths of the Bible, of which about a third is by Moses. It revolves around the special covenant which God made with Israel, described in the first 5 books. The rest of the O.T. shows how Israel broke that covenant and how God was preparing for a new and better covenant. The Old Testament consists of the Law, the Prophets and the Writings or Psalms (Luke 24:44). The New Testament revolves around the New Covenant which Jesus instituted to replace the Old Covenant. The N.T. consists of the 4 Gospels, Acts, the Epistles, and Revelation. The O.T. looked forward to Christ and the New Covenant, the N.T. presents Him and it.

3.   The Bible Has Sixty-Six Books.

The O.T. contains 39 books, the N.T. 27. Psalms is the longest, then Isaiah. Some books are in pairs (1 and 2 Samuel, Kings, Chronicles, and several of the epistles), only 1 is a set of three (1,2,3 John). Luke and Acts form a unique pair. There is occasional overlap of content and matter (Samuel-Kings-Chronicles, the 4 Gospels, etc.). The books of the Apocrypha are not part of the Bible. Though Romanism accepts them, neither the ancient Jews nor Protestants have ever accepted them. Nor are any of the books of the Pseudepigrapha in the Bible, such as the Book of Enoch. And of course, not the Book of Mormon, or other pretended books. The canon is closed. There are no “lost books” to be found which belong in the Bible.

4.   God Used Many Human Authors to Write the Bible.

Moses wrote more than any other individual, then David, Luke (Luke-Acts), Paul, John and Solomon. Other authors wrote only a single short book. Some of the most famous people in Scripture did not write a book in the Bible, such as John the Baptist, James the Apostle, Elijah, Mary, or the Lord Jesus. Some books are anonymous (such as Hebrews). All books were written by men, though two books are entirely about women (Ruth and Esther). The human authors were prophets, priests, kings, apostles, shepherds, generals, a doctor, court officials, and other occupations.

5.   The Bible Was Written in Hebrew, Aramaic and Greek.

Most of the Old Testament was written in Hebrew, the language of God’s Old Covenant people Israel. Hebrew is a Semitic language written from right to left, each word based around three consonants, with a grammar and vocabulary very different than English, but much in common with other ancient languages. Parts of Daniel and Ezra, and a few words and verses elsewhere, were written in Aramaic. Aramaic was the lingua franca of the ancient near east until superseded by Arabic. It was very similar to Hebrew. The N.T. was written in koine (common) Greek, more lofty in ideals. There are a few Latin words, too, and also a few Egyptian and others in Job.

6.   God Has Preserved the Original Bible Text.

The actual original parchments and papyri have long ago perished, but the inspired Word has been preserved by God through the ages. Jesus promised that His Word would never pass away (Matt. 24:35. Cf. 5:18, 1 Pet. 1:23-25). We call this Providential Preservation. There are no lost books, sentences, words or even letters. Nor will any yet be found, otherwise they would have been lost until now. Scripture is the means of salvation and the main means of revelation in this age. Its very nature requires its preservation. Satan has tried to destroy it, but the Bible is an anvil that has worn out many hammers. There are over 5,000 Greek manuscripts and over 1000 Hebrew manuscripts of the Bible, plus ancient translations and quotations. 

7.   We Should Not Add to or Subtract from the Bible.

Since the Bible is a complete unity, it is very serious to tamper with it. God warns against this in Rev. 22:18-19, Deut. 4:2, 12:32, Pro.30:6. Some English translations are based on the minority of ancient manuscripts which are faulty. They tend to subtract portions such as Mark 16:9-20. A few ancient manuscripts tend to add to the real text, such as the Codex Bezae. But the vast majority of manuscripts agree almost in complete detail, so it is wisest to stick to the middle and neither add to on the right side or subtract from on the left side. Nor may we substitute other words.

8.   The Bible Was First Translated into Ancient Languages.

Probably the first translation was when Jews in Egypt translated the Old Testament into Greek sometime around 200 B.C. This is known as the Septuagint. Other Greek translations followed. The Jews also produced paraphrased translations of most of the O.T. into Aramaic, known as Targums. Most were done after the time of Jesus. The Samaritans translated the Pentateuch into their language, with alterations. In the early church, there were early translations into Latin, Syriac, Coptic, Gothic, Armenian, Georgian, Ethiopic and Arabic. Some were better than others, and all are useful for study by scholars.

9.   There Have Been Many English Translations of the Bible.

There have been more translations of the Bible into English than into any other language. First there were bits and pieces by Bede and medieval monks. Then John Wycliffe translated the Bible from the Latin in the 14th century. William Tyndale translated the NT from Greek and was working on the OT during the Reformation. The 16th century saw many other fine translations, especially the Geneva Bible. The Authorized Version of 1611, known as the King James Version, has been the most popular one in history, even with its various slight revisions. Major revisions included the Revised Version, the American Standard Version, the Revised Standard Version, the New American Standard Version, and the New Revised Standard Version, the New King James Version, and the New International Version. There have also been Jewish and Catholic translations. Overall, over 100 translations have appeared.   (Pastor Beck’s Favorites – King James (KJV), New King James (NKJV), New American Standard (NASB), and the English Standard Version(ESV)

10. The Bible is God’s Word about Himself.

The Bible is the Book of God. It was inspired by God, written by God through the instrumentality of various human authors, and is primarily about God. It is God’s verbal revelation of Himself to us. It talks about Man, salvation, animals, the cosmos and other topics, but mainly about God. Its ethics come from God. Its stories tell how God has worked in history. Its songs sing to and about God. Specifically, it is a book about Jesus, the only mediator between God and Man. Praise God for His Word.

Luke 1:25-38

My sermon notes for Sunday morning, Dec 4th.  Remember, these are my personal study notes and not a manuscript of the sermon. They are provided as an outline each week for our Tabernacle Church family. The church provides a live stream of the service each Sunday at 10:30 on Facebook. We also provide the services through YouTube by Sunday afternoon.  You can find Sermon Notes, Family Devotional Guides, Prayer List, and other resources at our Church Website.

Luke 1:25-38 – The Divine Announcement

INTRO

  • The time is now.
  • The redeemer has come.
  • The birth announcement of Jesus Christ

Mary and Joseph – vv. 26-27

  • Young and innocent
  • God fearing (Joseph – Matthew 1:18-25)
  • Unknown
    • Nazareth
    • Not the capital…but a small town
    • Nothing good comes from Nazareth John 1:46
  • She was a young teen
    • Zec was a priest serving the temple
  • Unmarried, Virgin (sexually pure)

A great picture of God’s providence.  He has kept His word.  A Savior is to be born.  All that the OT pointed too is coming to fulfillment.

Gabriel’s Greeting – vv. 28-29

  • Zechariah had no personal greeting
  • Highly Favored one
    • God’s grace
    • Divine favor
  • Eph 1:6 – Blessed/Accepted in Beloved
  • The Lord is with you! (emphatic)
  • Mary was troubled and tried to discern
    • Confused, WHY WOULD GOD FAVOR ME?
    • Fear in the presence of the Lord

Gabriel’s Pronouncement -vv. 30-33

  • Do not be afraid – v 30
    • I come with blessing not judgement
  • You have found favor with God – v. 30
    • God’s sovereign grace… He chose her
  • You will conceive in your womb and bear a son – v. 31
  • You shall call His name Jesus – v. 31
    • Greek for the Hebrew word Yeshua… Yahweh Saves
  • He will be great – v. 31
    • Megas
    • John the Baptist is great in the Lord’s sight
    • JESUS IS GREAT!!!!!!
  • Called the Son of the Most High – v. 32
  • Given the throne of His Father – v. 32
    • 2 Samuel 7:12-14
    • Ps. 2:7-9
    • Micah 4:7
  • He will reign over the House of Jacob FOREVER – v. 33
  • His kingdom there will be no end – v. 33
    • Rev. 11:15

“with breathtaking brevity, in one vast, glorious revelation Gabriel succinctly summarized the entire ministry of the Lord Jesus Christ: His saving work, righteous life, deity, resurrection, ascension, glorious return, and kingdom rule.”

John F. MacArthur Jr., Luke 1–5, MacArthur New Testament Commentary (Chicago: Moody Publishers, 2009), 48.

Mary’s Response – v. 34

  • How will this be?
    • Fair question
    • She doubted yet trusted

Gabriel’s Explanation – vv. 35-37

  • The Holy one will come upon you
    • Spirit hovered at creation…now her at the birth (creation) and at our new birth (new creation)
  • Power of the most high will overshadow you
    • Surround (same usage as at the transfiguration)
  • THEREFORE, the child will be called HOLY-the SON OF GOD
  • Elizabeth is also conceived (by Zec.)
  • NOTHING WILL BE IMPOSSIBLE WITH GOD

Mary’s Faith – v. 38

  • I AM YOUR SERVANT OF THE LORD
    • Just like Hannah with Samuel 1 Sam. 1:1-2:10
  • Let it be according to your word

Roots of the Faith – The Clarity of Scripture

My sermon notes for Wednesday night, Nov 30th. Remember, these are my personal study notes and not a manuscript of the sermon. They are provided as an outline each week for our Tabernacle Church family. Our study over the next few months will be “The Roots of the Faith.” This study will focus on key biblical truths that will transform our thinking and allow us to faithfully live out the Christian life. The church provides a live stream of the service each Wednesday at 6:30 on Facebook. We also provide the services through YouTube. You can find Sermon Notes, Family Devotional Guides, Prayer List, and other resources at our Church Website.

Helpful Resources for this Study

50 Core Truths of the Christian Faith – Gregg R. Allision

Systematic Theology: An Introduction to Biblical Doctrine – Wayne Grudem

Biblical Doctrine: A Systematic Summary of Bible Truth – John MacArthur & Richard Mayhue

INTRO

  • Can we understand the Bible?
  • What does it take for me to learn the meaning of the Bible?
  • Why do so many people disagree over biblical matters of life?
  • Deut 6:6-7

Scripture is written in such a way that it can be understood by God’s people. (Gregg Allison, pg. 39)

The clarity of Scripture means that the Bible is written in such a way that it is able to be understood, but right understanding requires time, effort, the use of ordinary means, a willingness to obey, and the help of the Holy Spirit; and our understanding will remain imperfect in this lifetime (Wayne Grudem, pg. 109)

The Bible affirms its own clarity

  • Psalm 19:7; 119:130
  • We can know and understand.
  • It is progressive in nature.
  • We never learn everything.

We should not expect EVERYONE to grasp the truths of Scripture

  • 1 Cor 2:1, Luke 18:34
  • Can an unconverted person understand?
  • It is the spirit that teaches, guides, and illuminates.

Why do Christians misunderstand Scripture?

  • We are all sinful and fall short of God’s standard.
    • We need better hermeneutics (methods of interpretation).
      • The method of our study.  The process we utilize
    • We need better exegesis (process of interpreting a text).
      • The work of the study.  What does the text mean?

The role of teachers/scholars/theologians

  • They fulfill the office of teacher – 1 Cor 12:28.
    • They utilize their giftedness to build up the body.  A tool to help us understand more clearly.

Practical Considerations

  • There will be differences over minor doctrine, so there is liberty
  • See THEOLOGICAL TRIAGE on pastorjonbeck.com under topical studies
    • Major verse minor
  • Liberal Churches do not take the Bible as inerrant and infallible
    • All of Scripture is not true
    • Part truth, but not all
  • The lost world will never grasp the Bible as God’s Word
    • To them there is no absolute truth

Requirements for understanding scripture rightly

1. Time

2. Effort

3. The Use of Ordinary Means

  • Using a translation of the Bible in one’s own language
  • Listening to teachers of the Word, for God has given the gift of teaching to the church (1 Cor. 12:28).
  • Reading of commentaries where available, for these are merely the written form of what is taught by teachers in the church.
  • Being aware of the wisdom contained in the history of interpretation of the church (even if this only comes not firsthand but through reading commentaries that reflect some knowledge of that tradition).
  • Seeking understanding in fellowship with others, as in small group Bible studies (or at academic conferences).
  • Using modern tools such as concordances, Hebrew and Greek lexicons, grammars, and sources of historical background information, which help modern readers understand more precisely the sense of the original language and the historical context in which a passage was written.

4. A Willingness to Obey

5. The Help of the Holy Spirit

6. A Humble Recognition That Our Understanding Is Imperfect

7. The Reasons for These Requirements

We might ask why God did not give us something simpler, something where our understanding would be instantaneous and automatic? Perhaps for several reasons:

  1. The Complexity of the Subject Matter. God communicated to human beings in Scripture with the purpose of guiding the entire belief system and the lifelong conduct of billions of different people in hundreds of cultures throughout centuries of history. Communication sufficient for this task must necessarily be quite extensive and intricate. An infinite God is telling us about himself and his purposes in all creation! The subject matter is vast.
  2. The Value of Relationship. God delights to teach us in relationship with himself. The prayers for understanding that are found in Scripture (see section B.5 above) indicate an awareness that Scripture is rightly understood only in personal relationship with God, only in a context of prayer for his presence and his help in right understanding.
  3. The Value of a Lifelong Process. God causes us to delight in the process of growing in likeness to him. Growth in understanding Scripture is merely part of the larger process of growth in sanctification, and God in his wisdom has ordained that sanctification is a process, a lifelong journey.

God seems to delight in process, for he delights in gradually disclosing his glory over time. He took delight in creating the world not in one day but in six. He took delight in promising that the seed of the woman would bruise the head of the serpent and then in preparing the way for thousands of years so that “when the fullness of time had come, God sent forth his Son, born of woman, born under the law” (Gal. 4:4). He has taken delight in building and purifying his church for the past two thousand years.

And he takes delight when we continually increase in the knowledge of himself and his ways through his Word:

And so, from the day we heard, we have not ceased to pray for you, asking that you may be filled with the knowledge of his will in all spiritual wisdom and understanding, so as to walk in a manner worthy of the Lord, fully pleasing to him, bearing fruit in every good work and increasing in the knowledge of God. (Col. 1:9–10)

The process of understanding more of Scripture and more of God is one that will never end in this life. I expect that it will never end even in the age to come. We are finite and we can rejoice in the unending and delightful process of learning more about our infinite Creator[1]


[1] Wayne Grudem, Systematic Theology: An Introduction to Biblical Doctrine, Second Edition. (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan Academic, 2020), 113–122.

Luke 1:5-25

My sermon notes for Sunday morning, Nov 27th.  Remember, these are my personal study notes and not a manuscript of the sermon. They are provided as an outline each week for our Tabernacle Church family. The church provides a live stream of the service each Sunday at 10:30 on Facebook. We also provide the services through YouTube by Sunday afternoon.  You can find Sermon Notes, Family Devotional Guides, Prayer List, and other resources at our Church Website.

Luke 1:5-25 – Pointing the way… John the Baptist

INTRO

  • The preparation…
  • The coming of Christ is taking place
  • The announcement of the birth of John the Baptist
  • The messiah is coming

Zechariah and Elizabeth – vv. 5-9

  • Their character
    • Righteous before God
    • Walking blamelessly in God’s statues and commands
  • Their circumstances
    • No children
    • Society would have questioned their obedience to God
  • Their calling
    • Once in a lifetime for priestBoth faithful and serving…IN SPITE OF CIRCUMSTANCES
    • Altar of incense. Prayers lifted up to God
    • Serving = Do what the Lord has called us to do

Gabriel’s presence and Message – vv. 10-17

  • Do not be afraid – v.  13
  • Your prayer has been heard – v. 13
    • You will bear a son
    • You shall call him John
  • You will have joy and gladness
    • Many will rejoice at his birth
  • He will be great before the Lord
  • He will be filled with the Holy Spirit
    • Even from his mothers womb
  • He will turn many of the children of Israel to the Lord
  • He will go before him in the spirit and power of Elijah
    • Turn hearts
    • Make ready =for the Lord a people prepared

This is the FIRST VOICE OF GOD SINCE MALACHI…over 400 years.

Zechariah’s Reaction – v. 18

  • How shall I know this
    • He is standing before Gabriel?????
    • Has he forgotten about Abraham and Sarah?????
  • Before we judge… we must remember that no one is perfect.  He obviously was a righteous man that was serving the Lord.
  • A better question should be…. WHAT ARE WE DOUBTING ABOUT WHAT GOD?

Gabriel’s Closing Words – vv. 19-25

  • I am Gabriel
  • I stand in the presence of God
  • I was sent to speak
  • You will be silent until…

CONCLUSION

  • Redemptions History… all points to the Gospel
  • Over 400 years of silence… Gabriel speaks.
    • The forerunner is part of redemption history
    • A bridging of the Old and the New
  • Altar of incense
    • Must be holy – set apart
    • Our prayers to God… only by priest
  • JESUS FULFILLED…. on through Christ
  • THE LORD HAS DONE – v. 25
  • John the Baptist is pointing to the holy one
  • His message will be repentance
  • Their sin…. the need of forgiveness
  • The need for a HOLY ONE

Luke 1:1-4

My sermon notes for Sunday morning, Nov 20th.  Remember, these are my personal study notes and not a manuscript of the sermon. They are provided as an outline each week for our Tabernacle Church family. The church provides a live stream of the service each Sunday at 10:30 on Facebook. We also provide the services through YouTube by Sunday afternoon.  You can find Sermon Notes, Family Devotional Guides, Prayer List, and other resources at our Church Website.

Luke 1:1-4 – An Intro

INTRO

  • Why did Luke write the letter?
  • What does this Gospel letter teach us?
    • Jesus is the Son of Man
    • Jesus in His humanity
    • The historical certainty of the life of Jesus
  • The emphasis of Jesus’ ancestry, birth and early life before moving through His earthly ministry.
  • Luke was a gentile and Paul referred to him as the beloved physician (Col. 4:10-14)
  • Luke was not an eyewitness to the life of Christ but was a co-laborer with Paul. (2 Tim. 4:11)
  • We/Us passages – Acts 16:1-17; Acts 20:5-21:18; Acts 27:1-28:18
  • Wrote Luke and Acts around A.D. 60 as a two-volume work to Theophilus.
  • Key Themes
    • Salvation (Luke 1:69, Luke 1:77, Luke 2:30, Luke 19:9-10)Salvation for all people – Gentiles. Outcasts. Women.Holy Spirit (Luke 3:22, Luke 12:12)Discipleship (Luke 6:40, Luke 9:23-27, Luke 14:25-33,
    • Prayer (The emphasis on Jesus and prayer)

Luke is laying the foundation and credibility of his letter to Theophilus and the world.  We get a picture of the impact Jesus Christ had on those first believers and the early church.

They followed Christ closely

  • They personally knew Christ
  • The things accomplished
  • From the beginning
  • Eyewitnesses
  • Ministers of the Word
    • Servants of the word

They wrote the words of Christ carefully

  • It was very important for them to get it right.
  • It was real… the truth
  • Narrative of the things
  • Followed closely
  • Written and orderly account
    • Did research
    • Spoke with people

They understood the life of Christ should be lived with certainty

  • You may have certainty
    • To know fully, to come to know, to gain or receive full knowledge of, become fully acquainted with.
    • He had heard, but Luke wants HIM TO KNOW
      • KNOW CHRIST
      • KNOW WHAT IT MEANS TO LIVE FOR CHRIST
    • Not wavering
    • The assurance to keep going
    • Trust in His Lordship (Great Shepherd – Psalm 23:1-6)
      • His care for us
      • His provision for us
      • His leadership for us

1 Corinthians 16:5-24

My sermon notes for Sunday morning, Nov 13th.  Remember, these are my personal study notes and not a manuscript of the sermon. They are provided as an outline each week for our Tabernacle Church family. The church provides a live stream of the service each Sunday at 10:30 on Facebook. We also provide the services through YouTube by Sunday afternoon.  You can find Sermon Notes, Family Devotional Guides, Prayer List, and other resources at our Church Website.

1 Corinthians 16:5-24 A Picture of Faithful Ministry

INTRO

  • In Paul’s closing words we see a great picture for ministry
  • While we may not be a modern day Paul, we are called to serve the Lord faithfully.
  • Paul gives us a great example to learn from and follow after.

A desire to make a kingdom difference – vv. 5-9

A whatever and whenever attitude

  • The balance between God’s will and our will
  • Our passions
  • His purpose
  • Bloom where you are planted
  • James 4:13-17

Look for Gospel opportunities

  • Wide door for effective work – v. 9a
  •  MAKING MEMORIES (For us or for the LORD)

Expect many Challenges – v. 9b

  • Many adversaries – 2 Cor 1:8-10, 2 Cor 4:7-12
  • John MacArthur –“Consider it a challenge rather than a hinderance.”
  • We should love a challenge!
  • Expect, Embrace, Evolve

A devotedness to people -vv. 10-12

Timothy

  • Worked closely with Paul
  • Pastor at Ephesus
  • Usually served in difficult spots

Paul invested in him

Paul knew he needed encouragement

Apollos

  • Great speaker
  • Priscilla and Aquilla Acts 18:24-28
  • Part of some controversy in Corinth 1 Cor 1:12, 1 Cor. 3:4-8

Paul cared for him

  • No competition, no envy

Paul trusted him

  • Working together
  • LIFE IS MESSY

A deep conviction for spiritual growth – vv. 13-14

Paul was always challenging others to GROW! DO SOMETHING GREAT!

Just like a teacher inspires their students

Be watchful

  • Be alert

Stand firm in the faith

  • Maturing stability
  • 1 Cor 3:1 – Maturing

Act like men

  • Strong leadership
  • It is time to be different!

Be Strong

  • Spiritual strength
  • Eph 6:10 – Strong in the Lord
  • 2 Tim 2:1 – Strong by the grace of Christ
  • HIS STRENGTH NOT OURS

Do all in love

  • Leadership not dictatorship
  • 1 Cor 13
  • Care for others
  • Love for truth

A dependence upon the local church – vv. 15-22

  • Universal and Local
  • He knew they needed each other
    • TIMES ARE TOUGH… WE NEED EACH OTHER
    • We need you… you need the church
  • Be subject -accountability, direction
  • Refreshed our spirits
    • Send their greetings
    • TOGETHER, ALL IN
  • Holy kiss
    • Love, admiration
    • Family

Roots of the Faith – The Sufficiency and Necessity of Scripture

My sermon notes for Wednesday night, Nov 9th. Remember, these are my personal study notes and not a manuscript of the sermon. They are provided as an outline each week for our Tabernacle Church family. Our study over the next few months will be “The Roots of the Faith.” This study will focus on key biblical truths that will transform our thinking and allow us to faithfully live out the Christian life. The church provides a live stream of the service each Wednesday at 6:30 on Facebook. We also provide the services through YouTube. You can find Sermon Notes, Family Devotional Guides, Prayer List, and other resources at our Church Website.

Helpful Resources for this Study

50 Core Truths of the Christian Faith – Gregg R. Allision

Systematic Theology: An Introduction to Biblical Doctrine – Wayne Grudem

Biblical Doctrine: A Systematic Summary of Bible Truth – John MacArthur & Richard Mayhue


The Sufficiency and Necessity of Scripture

INTRO

  • Since Scripture is inspired and truthful, then it must also be sufficient and necessary.
  • Sola Scriptura – Scripture alone

Sufficiency of Scripture

The sufficiency of Scripture means that Scripture contained all the words of God he intended His people to have at each stage of redemptive history, and that it now contains everything we need God to tell us for salvation, for trusting Him perfectly, and for obeying Him perfectly. (Wayne Grudem)

Necessity of Scripture

Necessity is an attribute of Scripture whereby it is essential for knowing the way of salvation, for progressing in holiness, and for discerning in God’s will. (Gregg Allision)

Scripture

  • 2 Tim 3:16-17
  • Psalm 119 (some many verses!)
  • Deuteronomy 4:1-2; 6:6-7; 12:32
  • Proverbs 30:5-6
  • Romans 10:13-17
  • Matthew 4:4

Allow Scripture to guide your life

  • Scripture enables us to know Him (Salvation)
  • Scripture enables us to live for Him (Sanctification)
    • IT IS ENOUGH.
    • We need nothing else
  • We need to answer the questions of the day through the “lens of Scripture”
  • How to think about an issue
  • What to do in a situation
  • Psalm 32:8 – Instruct, Teach… the way you should go.
  • It will not answer every question we may ask, but it will answer the questions that pertain to my salvation and holiness!  How to know and live for the Lord.
  • Deut 29:29 – Secret things belong to God

Search Scripture for answers

  • We need to answer the questions of the day through the “lens of Scripture”
  • Not feeling
  • Not impressions
  • Not advice from the experts
  • Search the Word

Do not add to Scripture

  • Rev. 22:18
  • Book of Mormon
  • Traditions of the Church
    • Pope
  • Modern day prophet/new word
  • Adding legalistic requirements

1 Corinthians 16:1-4

My sermon notes for Sunday morning, Nov 6th.  Remember, these are my personal study notes and not a manuscript of the sermon. They are provided as an outline each week for our Tabernacle Church family. The church provides a live stream of the service each Sunday at 10:30 on Facebook. We also provide the services through YouTube by Sunday afternoon.  You can find Sermon Notes, Family Devotional Guides, Prayer List, and other resources at our Church Website.

1 Corinthians 16:1-4A Giving Heart

INTRO

  • Paul is closing the letter with final exhortations.
  • Encouraging the church to take part in giving to support the saints in Jerusalem
    • 2 Corinthians 8:1–7
    • 2 Corinthians 9:6–15
  • Encouraging an attitude of giving within the church
  • Their giving was a glorious picture of unity in the Gospel (helping other… to Jerusalem)
  • Each church doing their part for the kingdom
  • We should give
    • Deliberately (With a plan. On purpose)
    • Proportionally (we give as God has given)
    • Sacrificially (give the best not what is left over)
    • Joyfully – WITH A JOYFUL HEART

A Heart for Missions – v. 1

  • Others
  • Saints, Galatia, Jerusalem

We give so that:

  • Others may share
  • Others may hear
  • Others may be saved

A Heart for Worship – v. 2

  • First day of the week
  • Privately
  • With thanksgiving – Phil. 4:18-20
  • Not hypocritically – Acts 5:1-11

There are three kinds of giving: grudge giving, duty giving, and thanksgiving. Grudge giving says, “I have to”; duty giving says, “I ought to”; thanksgiving says, “I want to.”

Robert Rodenmeyer 

A Heart for Unity – vv. 3-4

  • Together as a body
  • Same mission, purpose (THE MISSION)
  • Doing more together
  • Others included in the process (Acts 20)
  • No church is just a church… we are part of THE CHURCH.
    • Unity for the Gospel
    • Not just unity for the sake of togetherness
    • IT IS IMPORTANT TO SEE THE ACCOUNTABILITY IN GETTING THE OFFERING TO JERUSALEM
      • We should take great care in how and to whom we give.

It is interesting to read in Acts 20 the wide variety of people who did accompany Paul on his return to Jerusalem after his third missionary trip. Listed there are people from all the major areas from which Paul gathered funds (although no one is mentioned from Achaia): from Galatia, Gaius of Derbe and Timothy of Lystra; from Macedonia, Sopater of Berea, and Aristarchus and Secundus of Thessalonica; from Asia (Ephesus), Tychicus and Trophimus, and (indirectly) Luke from Troas.

Verlyn D. Verbrugge, “1 Corinthians,” in The Expositor’s Bible Commentary: Romans–Galatians (Revised Edition), ed. Tremper Longman III & Garland, David E., vol. 11 (Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan, 2008), 407.

CONCLUSION

Romans 15:25-33

  • Owe to them
  • Collected – literally… friuts
  • Because someone gave… you were saved (Obviously, it is by the power of the Spirit we are saved, but just think about how faithful believers coming before us invested in your spiritual life.)
  • Our giving is the fruits of our convsersion. To pass along to others.
  • WE GIVE SO OTHERS MAY HEAR, BELIEVE, AND GROW….. SO THAT OTHERS CAN……